How To Check Minnesota Public Court, County, Criminal, And Phone Records

Not too many Minnesota residents know this, but there is a plethora of public record information available for anyone to lookup which can include criminal history, divorce records, and so much more.

Learn more about how to find out criminal, county, and court records in the state of Minnesota below.

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Minnesota Public Record Criminal Records Lookup

MN Criminal Records

To Start, Check With Your State Government Offices

Each state has a different way to maintain and distribute criminal history records to the public. For Minnesota, there are a few options depending on what you need.

To lookup someone else’s criminal history, you would need to head over to The Minnesota Public Criminal History Record Search Website. To lookup your own criminal history, you would need to head over to or write to the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension.

Here is their address: Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension
CHA Unit
1430 Maryland Ave. E.
St. Paul, MN 55106

If you choose to obtain your records at the Bureau of Criminal Apprehension, their hours are 8:15 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday (with the exception of holidays, they are closed).

You will need to have on hand a form of government-issued photo identification. There is no fee to simply view your record. If you want a copy it is a small fee of $8.00.

Read Our Bulletproof Guide On How To Do A Reverse Cell Phone Lookup!

Minnesota County Records Lookup

MN Court Records

To Start, Look At The Contact County Clerk Offices

County offices hold an abundance of records available to the public for no cost. The challenge is finding an efficient method of sorting through all of these county records to find what you came for.

A decent place to begin is at the county office of the county you wish to search in. You can talk to a clerk at the office. These county offices usually offer detailed information on archived criminal and civil court records.

County Offices Can Have The Following Information Available Depending On The County:

  • Access case records
  • Arrest records
  • Civil court
  • Court calendars
  • Criminal records
  • Divorce records
  • Eviction
  • Name change
  • Restraining order
  • Tickets and fines
  • Wills and estates
  • Property information search
  • Sheriff's foreclosures
  • Land Records
  • Election Results
  • Finding Your Commissioner
  • Campaign Finance
  • Library Catalogs
  • Interactive Maps
  • In-custody and Inmate Search

If you know the name of a specific government employee that can help assist you on their search efforts but you can’t remember their contact information, you can use the Government's Minnesota Phone Book.

This Minnesota Phone Book allows you to lookup names of government workers (you can even just put their first name in if you don’t remember their last) and the results will pop up showing their occupation and contact information. You can also narrow down results by selecting the agency that the person is employed under

How Did The Phone Book Evolve Into A Digital Cell Phone Directory? Read The Surprising Answer!

Another Option: Contact The Minnesota Department Of Health

The Minnesota Department Of Health is also a great place to find records, depending on what you are looking for. You can oftentimes find marriage, divorce, birth, and death records at these public health departments.

There are different rules depending on the type of record that you want to obtain.

Below is the process for each of these records:

Marriage certificates - Copies of marriage certificates can be found at the county that issued the marriage license. You can also lookup marriage records in the Minnesota Official Marriage System (also known as MOMS), which is an online database of marriage certificates

Divorce Decrees - Divorce decrees can be found at the county district court office that granted the divorce.

Birth certificates - Birth certificates can be bought (in person) at any Minnesota county vital records office. They need to be born in Minnesota from 1900 to the present.

Death Certificates - The Office of Vital Records maintains all death records for Minnesota.

Minnesota Court Records Lookup

MN Court Records

Start With The Minnesota Court Administrator’s Office Court Administrator offices are available in all states by and large in charge of keeping up and appropriating court records to the general public.

The Minnesota Court Administrator’s website can be used as a search tool to lookup court records. You can lookup court records by clicking this link.

When clicking the link, there are two options when looking through the Court Administrator’s Office online. You can lookup under:

Minnesota District (Trial) Court Case Search To lookup district court cases, you will need to do so in the Minnesota Public Access (MPA) search. Of course, the information that they have is limited. Additionally, court documents can’t be looked at in MPA Remote currently.

Access Court of Appeals or Supreme Court Case Records

The Minnesota Supreme Court, as well as the Court of Appeals, have court and case records at the disposal online for anyone to view through the Minnesota Appellate Courts Case Management System (also known as P-MACS). If you can’t find a document on P-MACS, you can request it by email.

Get Familiar With PACER

PACER (short for Public Access To Court Electronic Records) is a government benefit that gives public access to electronic case and docket data. PACER's online lookup service is a benefit that allows it’s users to lookup court cases across the country. To benefit from PACER's national directory of court records, you have to register on the website (Pacer.Gov).

Registration is always free, however each page of records you access costs $0.08.

Minnesota Public Phone Records Check

MN Phone Number Lookup Records

Here are a few options for you. You can start out by finding out what area the phone number originates from by looking up the area code.

Popular / Most common Areacodes Serviced:

Area code 218, the Northern area of Minnesota.
Area code 320, the area that covers approximately the central third of the state with the exception of the greater Minneapolis-Saint Paul area.
Area code 507, the lower third of Minnesota
Area code 612, which serves Minneapolis, Fort Snelling, Richfield, and Saint Anthony
Area code 651, which covers Saint Paul, the suburbs to the East of the Minneapolis-Saint Paul metropolitan area, and added areas that are along the Mississippi River all the way to Wabasha
Area code 763, which serves the suburbs that are northwest of Minneapolis
Area code 952, area that covers the suburbs that are southwest of Minneapolis, add Lakeville and Apple Valley.

Popular Networks And Network Coverage In MN

The most popular mobile phone networks in Minnesota are AT&T, Verizon, T-Mobile, and Sprint. If you are getting a call from a cell phone number, it is more than likely from one of these providers.

This guide from WhistleOut shares with us about some interesting coverage finds.

Here Is what they found:

  • AT&T has the strongest coverage.
  • T-Mobile and Verizon have reliable coverage throughout Minnesota. What could be improved.
  • Sprint needs some improvement.

Whistleout also noted that in isolated areas, coverage was not dependable.

To lookup the full phone number, you can use the Minnesota Whitepages.

If you have trouble finding the mobile phone number records you are looking for, you can try our phone directory. We have a minnesota reverse phone lookup where you can search any unknown phone number.

Bonus: Weird, Surprising And Interesting Minnesota State Laws

You would think a state that is progressive as Minnesota would have removed all of these laws by now, but unfortunately Minnesota still has some more than questionable laws.

Here are the most interesting, weird and/ or funny Minnesota laws:

Minnesota claims that mosquitos are a public nuisance. That is so Minnesotan! If you’ve been to Minnesota, or live there, you can definitely relate.

To sleep legally in Minnesota, you need to be wearing clothes. How would they know if you broke the law?

You can’t legally grease a pig and then let it go with the intention of then trying to catch it. You’d be surprised at how many people try this (and have broken the law).

It is illegal to cross the Minnesota border if you have a duck on your head. Not sure why you would do this, but also not sure why this has to be a law.

If you are in Minneapolis, you could get in trouble for walking down an ally. For how busy Minneapolis is, I guess this one makes sense.

If you are a woman, don’t pretend to be Santa Claus in Minnesota, or perhaps you will end up in jail (for up to 30 days). But men can pretend to be Santa.

Red Cars are not supposed to drive down Lake Street in Minneapolis… I wonder how many people have broken this law, and if anyone has actually been penalized for it.

If a married woman (married men are ok) is caught in the act of adultery she can be legally sentenced to imprisonment, a fine, or both. If then man she commits adultery with knows that she is married, he can legally be in trouble as well. Adultery is actually illegal in 21 states, but each state has unique set rules on what degree of crime adultery as well as the maximum sentence.

In Minnesota, it’s illegal for a cat to chase a dog up a telephone pole. Ok, how do you enforce that law?

If you’re a man, it’s illegal in Minnesota to have relations with a live fish. But wait, what about women?